How Can I Get Kids to Eat Real Food? Tip #1

    

 To read an updated version of this post, come visit my new blog

Paleo Diet Basics!


http://www.paleodietbasics.net/paleo-diet-plan


11 comments:

Jen said...

I really believe this is true. You have to just know and convey to your kids that this is just the best way to eat. It should become second nature. However, if a parent starts later in the child's life there may be resistance. Old habits die hard for all of us. But kids are much more flexible regarding change than we are as adults . . .don't you think? ;)

Allison at Novice Life said...

I agree; I have a 9 mo old and I am trying my hardest to instill a traditional foods diet with him. It is difficult when my family doesn't do the same, but I just keep reminding myself this is what is better for him!

Heather @ Nourishing the Heart said...

Thanks for the comparison to eating kosher. That helps solidify things for me a bit!

Marina said...

Great post, I do think we have to be really firm with our kids about eating real food. That said, I know some kids might be picky because of gut issues...So they need to heal their gut before they can enjoy eating real food. GAPS diet is very helpful for that!

Ruth Almon said...

Hi, Marina. It's sort of a chicken and egg thing. If they eat properly from the start, don't get unnecessary antibiotics etc. they won't have such dire gut issues. But once they DO have serious gut issues, eating good food can become impossible. In these cases, GAPS can be a Godsend.

ValerieAnne said...

I love this! I'm sending this link to my traditional nutrition yahoo group! We are a former WAPF chapter.

Jill@ RealFoodForager.com said...

Thanks for linking your great post to FAT TUESDAY. This was very interesting! Hope to see you next week!

Be sure to visit RealFoodForager.com on Sunday for Sunday Snippets – your post from Fat Tuesday may be featured there!
http://realfoodforager.com/2011/11/fat-tuesday-november-29-2011/

Ruth Almon said...

Hi ValerieAnne,

Glad you liked the post. Don't forget to come back for more tips.
May I ask why you are a former WAF chapter?

Moonbeams and Eco-Dreams said...

Good point. When you start young they don't know any different. My son has simply internalized that he cannot eat foods with gluten or dairy because he started at three.

When I was pregnant I read in a baby food making book that if you don't feed your kids sweets or highly refined foods before age two they will be good, varied eaters. I decided to try it. He had his 1st birthday cake and didn't have his first cookie until 18 months (it was that organic baby kind that hardly has any sugar) and he eats fruits, vegetables - all of it. And for an Autistic child to THAT varied of a eater is almost unheard of. I think setting up his taste buds early might have helped.

'Becca said...

I definitely agree with the principle...but I live in a neighborhood with a large Orthodox Jewish population, and I HAVE seen a couple of kids throwing tantrums because their parents wouldn't let them have a non-kosher food! They weren't rebelling about the kosher idea in general, just captivated by a particular yummy-looking food that other kids were enjoying.

My son (almost 7) has generally taken on my opinions and routinely comes home from school with shocked stories about what junk was served in the school lunch (he brings his lunch) or brought in someone else's lunchbox. But what has really taught him to heed my nutritional guidance is the couple of times when I (or someone else supervising him) allowed him to over-indulge on something unhealthy and then he felt bad. In particular, he's learned that a sweet simple-carb snack needs to be consumed with plenty of water, a sweet drink needs to be consumed with real food, and the combination of sweet snack and sweet drink will make him vomit! One friend's mom criticized me for "crippling" my child so he can't handle that much sugar like "normal kids"--but I would much rather he be crippled that way than be able to suck down sugar in quantities that would cripple him with rotten teeth, obesity, and diabetes!

Ruth Almon said...

Hi Becca,
Yeah I'm sure some orthodox kids have tantrum about food sometimes... but the principle holds. Sounds like you have the power of your convictions.

It's sad that feeding your child good food is so outside the norm.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...