100% Organic, All-Natural, Grassfed Cyanide

 

 

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7 comments:

Jen said...

Well glad to hear you are NOT DEAD! So, I am guessing that non-wild are modified not be toxic? I am extremely curious now.

Funny, because as I was reading the upper portion of the article I was thinking --"man, I would LOVE to find a wild almond tree on a hike." :)

BTW - got your email. Will reply soon.

France@beyondthepeel said...

I am so glad you didn't get sick. I can completely relate. Not because I have eaten from a wild almond tree, but because I absolutely would have, given the chance. Thank you for sharing your lesson with us. Who knows how many lives you may have saves! :)

Anonymous said...

I've heard that not all wild almonds are equal -- but that humans have selectively learned which species are good, and bred almonds for less cyanide. I went on a cruise with my family, and we went on a shore excursion into a rainforest in the Carribbean. The guide found a wild almond, which he knew to be non-poisonous, but cautioned that some are. After the guide's warning, though, no one wanted to eat the almond. Having taken plant taxonomy in college, I am less squeamish about eating plants in the field that have been identified... so my whole family pointed and said, "She'll eat it!". I found that particular almond to be a bit dry, flaky and not particularly flavorful... but apparently each species is different... but yes, it is important to know a plant very specifically before eating... I usually only eat ones that don't have any toxic "look alikes", like blackberry :-) It is easy to make a mistake with plants... but nice to find and eat something directly from nature...

Indio said...

I'm glad this story had a happy ending. I know people that regularly eat the curly, leafy tops of carrots. My granny, who grew up on a farm, always warned me about them because of the alkaloids.

Eleanor @ Planned Resilience said...

Glad you didn't win a Darwin Award. Never heard about this before. Commercial almonds must have had most of the prussic acid bred out of them. This was a really good story.

Kendra at New Life On A Homestead said...

Oh wow!! I would have never known! You'd think it would have been completely harmless... even beneficial! Thanks so much for sharing :) Glad you were led to the cautions as you googled! Makes me think that maybe the Lord made them so hard to get into for a reason, lol!

Thanks for linking up to the Barn Hop!! What an important lesson to share.

Jill @RealFoodForager.com said...

Thanks for linking your great post to FAT TUESDAY. This was very interesting! Hope to see you next week!

Be sure to visit RealFoodForager.com on Sunday for Sunday Snippets – your post from Fat Tuesday may be featured there!

http://realfoodforager.com/2011/11/fat-tuesday-november-15-2011/

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