Gaps Intro: Stage 6

This is the last intro stage, before starting the regular Gaps protocol. As you can see below, it isn’t too different from stage 5.
The GAPS intro: stage 6 consists of all the things you could eat in GAPS intro: Stage 5, with the addition of the bolded items.
Introduction Stage 6
1.    Start day with a glass of water.
2.    Add fruit to freshly pressed vegetable juices.  Apple, pineapple, mango. Avoid citrus. Drink on an empty stomach.
3.    Drink stock. 
4.    Scrambled eggs with ghee or animal fat. Serve with avocado and cooked vegetables, especially onion.
5.    Add cooked applesauce.
6.    Add peeled, raw apple (must be ripe). Gradually introduce other raw fruit and honey.
7.    Add raw vegetables. Start with lettuce and peeled cucumber, increasing gradually. Gradually add carrot, tomato, onion, cabbage. Chew well.
8.    Roasted or grilled meats. Serve with cooked vegetables and sauerkraut.
9.    Olive oil - 1-2 tbsp. per meal.
10. Stews and casseroles made with meats and vegetables (no spices), lots of fat.
11. Whey/sour cream/yogurt/kefir.
12. Fermented fish or smoked salmon.
13. Homemade ghee.
14. Ripe avocado.
15. Bake bread from ground almonds or other nuts and seeds.
16. Add sauerkraut and fermented vegetables to 1-4 teaspoons with every meals.
17. Soup made from stock: onions, carrots, broccoli, leeks, cauliflower, zucchini, squash, pumpkin, (Cabbage, carrots, greens, peppers) - not parsnips, potato, yams
18. Ginger tea



Want to read more about GAPS?
What is the GAPS Diet?
What Can You Eat on GAPS?
GAPS Intro: Stage 1
GAPS Intro: Stage 2
GAPS Intro: Stage 3
GAPS Intro: Stage 4

GAPS Intro: Stage 5

This post was shared with Natural Family Awareness, Food Renegade, the Nourishing Gourmet, and Kelly the Kitchen Kop.

30-Second Halva Dessert

Halva is a sweet made from sesame seeds and eaten in the Middle East, India, the Balkans, and elsewhere. The recipe varies a little, from place to place. The kind I know has a very particular crumbly, slightly chewy-sticky texture that is created during the process of cooking then cooling the ingredients.
I’m always on the lookout for ways to simplify recipes, so it was very cool to learn that a friend found a way to get the homemade halva taste without the work.
Why is this halva a great choice for dessert?
The recipe has only two ingredients – honey and tahini sauce (or tehina, as it’s called here, in Israel). We don’t need a lot of sugar in our diets, but when you do want something sweet, raw honey is an excellent option. (Find out why). Tehina is an excellent addition to your diet. It’s a treatment for joint pain and is full of minerals, including calcium. Check out my guest post in Green Prophet to learn more. 
Ok. So what is the recipe, you ask.
Preparation time: 1 minute  (I was totally exaggerating about the 30 seconds)
Start to finish: 1 minute
Ingredients
3 tbsp. tehina paste (from hulled sesame seeds, not whole)
1 tbsp. raw honey, or to taste.
Method
1. Mix.

 2. Eat.

GAPS Intro: Stage 5

The GAPS intro: stage 5 consists of all the things you could eat in GAPS intro: Stage 4, with the addition of the bolded items. 
GAPS Introduction Stage 5
1.    Start day with a glass of water.
2.    Add fruit to freshly pressed vegetable juices. Apple, pineapple, mango. Avoid citrus. Drink on an empty stomach.
3.    Drink stock. 
4.    Scrambled eggs with ghee or animal fat. Serve with avocado and cooked vegetables, especially onion.
5.    Add cooked applesauce.
6.    Add raw vegetables. Start with lettuce and peeled cucumber, increasing gradually. Gradually add carrot, tomato, onion, cabbage. Chew well.
7.    Roasted or grilled meats. Serve with cooked vegetables and sauerkraut.
8.    Olive oil - 1-2 tbsp. per meal.
9.    Stews and casseroles made with meats and vegetables (no spices), lots of fat.
10. Whey/sour cream/yogurt/kefir.
11. Fermented fish or smoked salmon.
12. Homemade ghee.
13. Ripe avocado.
14. Bake bread from ground almonds or other nuts and seeds.
15. Add sauerkraut and fermented vegetables to 1-4 teaspoons with every meals.
16. Soup made from stock: onions, carrots, broccoli, leeks, cauliflower, zucchini, squash, pumpkin, (Cabbage, carrots, greens, peppers) - not parsnips, potato, yams
17. Ginger tea

 Ah… the joy of raw vegetables. I didn’t realise how much I’d miss them. I think what I missed most was having something fresh and crunchy alongside my cooked food. I like that combination of flavors and textures.
I haven’t tried cooked applesauce yet, mainly because of the price of organic apples. I was in the health food store and saw them at a great price – much less than regular apples. Well, this was great! Too good to be true. I started filling a bag. Turns out I was looking at the wrong price. The actual cost was four times as much. Oops.

Apple
Why you should avoid non-organic apples

I don’t buy absolutely everything organic, so why won’t I compromise on apples? They are #1 on the EWG’s 2011 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce. This means that they have a high likelihood of “being consistently contaminated with the greatest number of pesticides at the highest levels.”

Additionally, non-organic apples often don’t taste good to me. With certain vegetables, you really can’t taste the difference between organic and non-organic, but I find that many of the regular apples grown locally are either tasteless, have a mealy texture, or both.

Want to learn more? Consider buying the book.




Want to read more about GAPS?
What is the GAPS Diet?
What Can You Eat on GAPS?
GAPS Intro: Stage 1
GAPS Intro: Stage 2
GAPS Intro: Stage 3
GAPS Intro: Stage 4


Apple image courtesy of Doug88888
This post was shared with Delicious Osessions and Gnowfglins.

Robyn O'Brien Speaks Out


Robyn O'Brien speaks out about how she learned to feed her kids right.



This post was shared with the Healthy Home Economist.

Gaps Intro: Stage 4

The GAPS intro: stage 4 consists of all the things you could eat in GAPS intro: Stage 3, with the addition of the bolded items.

Introduction Stage 4
1.    Start day with a glass of water.
2.    Freshly pressed vegetable juices. Start with a few tablespoons of filtered carrot juice. Drink diluted with warm water or mixed with yogurt or whey. Drink slowly. Increase to 1 cup a day. When tolerated, add celery, cabbage, mint leaves. Drink on an empty stomach.
3.    Drink stock. 
4.    Scrambled eggs with ghee or animal fat. Serve with avocado and cooked vegetables, especially onion.
5.    Roasted or grilled meats. Serve with cooked vegetables and sauerkraut.
6.    Olive oil – start with a few drops, increase to 1-2 tbsp. per meal.
7.    Stews and casseroles made with meats and vegetables (no spices), lots of fat.
8.    Whey/sour cream/yogurt/kefir.
9.    Fermented fish or smoked salmon.
10. Homemade ghee.
11. Ripe avocado – start with 1-3 teaspoons and gradually increase.
12. Bake bread from ground almonds or other nuts and seeds. Gradually increase amount.
13. Add sauerkraut and fermented vegetables up to 1-4 teaspoons with every meals.
14. Soup made from stock: onions, carrots, broccoli, leeks, cauliflower, zucchini, squash, pumpkin, (Cabbage, carrots, greens, peppers) - not parsnips, potato, yams
15. Ginger tea

The pressed vegetable juices were a totally experience new for me. I don’t have a juicer, so for now I’ve just bought juice on a few occasions at one of the many juice stands around Tel Aviv. The combination I tried - carrot, beet, apple and ginger - was surprisingly tasty.
If you read the list above carefully, you’ll know that fresh apple isn’t allowed until intro stage 6. However, I was showing some signs of being too low carb (dry eyes, dry mouth) and was losing weight that I didn’t want to lose, so I’ve skipped ahead to the full GAPS diet and I feel better.

GAPS Intro: Stage 3
GAPS Intro: Stage 2
GAPS Intro: Stage 1
What is the GAPS Diet?
What Can You Eat on GAPS?


This post was shared with Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Whole New Mom, Real Food Freaks, Food Renegade, and Real Food Forager.

Lewis Black on Milk and Water

Lewis Black's take on nutritional science. If you don't like profanity, this clip probably isn't for you.

How Reid Kimball Cured his Crohn’s Disease


It’s worth taking a look at Seth Roberts’ article on BoingBoing, Grandmother Knows Best about Crohn’s Disease.
After years of taking medication with little respite from his suffering, Reid Kimball found relief by making dietary changes. He followed a protocol similar to GAPS called the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. What did this involve?

“He threw out almost all his food. He had been eating Hungry Man TV dinners, Cookie Crisp cereal, Papa John's pizza, Mountain Dew soda, potato chips, gummy bears, and so on. He stopped drinking milk. He started cooking from scratch. He made omelets and vegetable chicken stir fry, for example. He made muffins with almond flour, sweetening them with honey rather than sugar. He tried to avoid restaurants. When he couldn't avoid them, he'd order a hamburger and eat everything except the bun.”
Reid Kimball’s symptoms disappeared and a new colonoscopy corroborated that he had indeed healed.

What drives me insane about his story is that after managing to cure himself of a supposedly incurable disease, he reported his success to two gastroenterologists and… his doctors showed no interest. These doctors no doubt see other Crohn’s patients every week. Those patients suffer terribly. No doubt, like in Reid’s case, for some their daily medication doesn’t really help. And when they ask, as some will, whether diet can help, they’ll hear the conventional wisdom, “There's no firm evidence that what you eat actually causes inflammatory bowel disease”.[1] And there will never be “firm evidence” because little to no research is done on search for dietary solutions.

This post was shared with Kelly the Kitchen Kop, Food Renegade and Real Food Freaks.

GAPS Intro: Stage 3

The GAPS intro: stage 3 consists of all the things you could eat in GAPS intro: Stage 2, with the addition of the bolded items.

GAPS Introduction Stage 3
1.  Start day with a glass of water.
2.  Meat or fish stock (and meat, marrow and soft tissue from bones) with all the fat: with every meal
3.  Scrambled eggs with ghee or animal fat. Serve with avocado and cooked vegetables, especially onion.
4.  Stews and casseroles made with meats and vegetables (no spices), lots of fat.
5.  Whey/sour cream/yogurt/kefir.
6.  Fermented fish or smoked salmon.
7.  Homemade ghee.
8.  Ripe avocado – start with 1-3 teaspoons and gradually increase.
9.  Pancakes – made of organic nut butter, such as almond, eggs, and winter squash, marrow, or zucchini (courgette).
10. Add sauerkraut and fermented vegetables to 1-4 teaspoons with every meal.
11. Soup made from stock: onions, carrots, broccoli, leeks, cauliflower, zucchini, squash, pumpkin, (Cabbage, carrots, greens, peppers) - not parsnips, potato, yams
12. Ginger tea
My son and I are keeping up with the soups and stews, eating lots of eggs and homemade fermented foods, and have added a little avocado into our diets. We’ve also started taking a daily probiotic capsule. My son and I are getting generous amounts of tallow and butter (we tolerate butter well so I didn’t make more ghee) in our cooking. I’ve had no new fermented fish adventures, but I’ll get back to that.
I tried a version (actually 2 versions) of the GAPS pancakes yesterday and they were quite nice. The texture isn’t like a regular pancake. It had an acorn squash texture, which isn’t unpleasant, just different. To prepare it, I mixed 1 small baked acorn squash with 5 tablespoons almond butter and one egg. Then it got scientific. I split this mixture into two. I added a little organic honey to one, salted the other, and prepared them both in lots of butter. The verdict: the savory pancake won (it went well with the avocado), but they were both good. Unfortunately, I think I’ll be holding off with the pancakes for a while; I have a slight reaction to them. Maybe I’ll try another combination – another type of squash or another type of nut butter and see if I fare better.

Want to know more about GAPS?
What Is the GAPS Diet?
What Can You Eat on GAPS
GAPS Intro: Stage 1
GAPS Intro: Stage 2
Are you thinking about going on the GAPS diet? Consider purchasing Dr. Campbell-McBride's Book.


Gaps Intro: Stage 2

I’m finding the second stage of the GAPS diet much easier than the first, simply because of the additional variety. On Gaps Intro stage 2, you continue to eat everything you ate on stage 1, with a few additions. I’ve listed below what you can eat. The new foods are bolded.
Introduction Stage 2
1.    Start day with a glass of water.
2.    Meat or fish stock (and meat, marrow and soft tissue from bones) with all the fat: with every meal
3.    Organic egg yolks: Start with one a day and increase to one with each bowl of soup. When well tolerated, add whites.
4.    Stews and casseroles made with meats and vegetables (no spices), lots of fat.
5.    Increase amounts of whey/sour cream/yogurt/kefir.
6.    Fermented fish or smoked salmon.
7.    Homemade ghee – 1 tsp. per day.
8.    Soup made from stock: onions, carrots, broccoli, leeks, cauliflower, zucchini, squash, pumpkin, (Cabbage, carrots, greens, peppers) - not parsnips, potato, yams
9.    Serve juice from fermented foods with each meal.
10. Ginger tea

A sample Gaps Intro stage 2 day:
Breakfast was two eggs cooked in ghee. Fried eggs aren’t strictly stage 2, but I jumped ahead to stage 3 with the eggs because I’m quite sure they agree with me.
Lunch: Leftover One-Pot Chicken
Dinner: I made chicken soup from fresh organic chicken. I then cooked a package of parsley, one of coriander, green onions – all chopped plus a grated carrot in the broth and added some small slices of chicken. It made for a very tasty soup!
Additions:
With each meal I eat homemade dill pickles and fermented sauerkraut.
I’ve been having a few teaspoons of whey whenever I can find a way to slip it in. It isn’t particularly tasty, but the taste seems to disappear well when mixed with other foods.
I also had about a teaspoon of goat yogurt.
For hot drinks, I’ve been having either ginger tea or a cup of hot bone broth.
Did you notice fermented fish on the stage 2 list? I actually made that – and it was easy. The taste wasn’t too bad either, but not great. The bigger problem is that it keeps for a very, very short time. I plan to vary the dish a little until I get it right. When I’m satisfied with the result, I’ll post a recipe.

If you’re interested in finding out more about the GAPS diet, check out Dr. Campbell McBride’s book:



This post was shared with the Healthy Home Economist and Day 2 Day Joys.
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